HGNI logo

About the Neighborhood

Since the 1930s, Harambee has been a hub for African American culture and heritage. Originally settled by German immigrants in the 1800s, the African American community grew over the years and reached its height by the 1970s. Harambee was particularly attractive to working class families because of the modest and tidy single-family homes and proximity to downtown.

Neighborhood Borders

Harambee is bordered by Holton Street to the east, Interstate - 43 to the west, North Avenue to the south, and Capitol Drive to the north. Riverworks Development Corporation mainly focuses in the area north of Burleigh Street.

The neighborhood is supported by the Harambee Great Neighborhood Initiative (HGNI), a community-based nonprofit coalition with the mission of assisting residents of the Harambee neighborhood in realizing their vision for the community. As one of LISC Milwaukee’s Sustainable Communities, the HGNI prioritizes building resident capacity in its effort to support this vibrant north side neighborhood. 

Through the community informed Neighborhood Action Plan, the HGNI and its coalition of nonprofit agencies and resident groups are improving the quality of life in Harambee through creative resident and organizational collaborations, neighborhood specific home ownership resources, and a variety of other quality of life projects and programs designed to form lasting connections and sustainable community development.

 

Housing 

The homes in Harambee are mainly single family unites or duplexes. Though there aer some examples of newer construction, the majority of these homes were built when the area was settled by Polish and German immigrants, between the late 1800s and the 1920s. As a result, there are examples of unique Milwaukee architecture, such as the Polish flat and the Milwaukee Bungalow. Many homes have retained the built-in cabinets and leaded glass features that make these homes distinctive.

In 2016, the listing price range was $2,500 to $114,900, with a median list price of $58,700. The median close price was $35, 450.

Neighborhood Assets

The beerline Recreational Trail cuts northwest through both the Harambee and Riverwest neighborhoods. This trail is used by cyclists and pedistrians, both recreationally and as transportation to nearby jobs and shopping. Clinton Rose Park features summer softball leagues and a Senior Center where neighbors can stay connected.

Learn more about Harambee here and about the Harambee Great Neighborhood Initiative here or contact the HGNI at (414) 349-2794 or rickb@riverworksmke.org


Riverwest

Riverworks Development Corporation

About the Neighborhood

Riverworks, the fiscal agent of HGNI, is a community-based nonprofit that partners with the HGNI in serving the Harambee neighborhood, though its service area also includes the Riverwest neighborhood and the Riverworks Business Improvement District (BID). Portions of Harambee are in a City-designated Targeted Investment Neighborhood (TIN), which offers partially forgivable loans for home repairs to landlords and home owners who qualify.  Riverworks is also a member of the Healthy Neighborhood Initiative, which is guided by principles that promote social connections as a way to empower residents to manage the physical conditions and image of their neighborhood while supporting a stable real estate market.

Neighborhood Borders

The Riverwest neighborhood is bordered by the Milwaukee River to the east, Holton Street to the west, North Avenue to the south, and Capitol Drive to the north. Riverworks Development Corporation mainly focuses in the area north of Burleigh Street.

An investment from the Kresge Foundation supports the extension of the Beerline Recreational Trail as a part of a Creative Placemaking initiative that is transforming this once abandoned railroad corridor into public recreational space.  This investment facilitates new strategies related to the foreclosure crisis and offers positive solutions by transforming problem properties into opportunities.

Riverwest mural

Between a being a designated TIN, part of the Healthy Neighborhood Initiative, and a Creative Placemaking investment, it’s an exciting time to purchase a home in Harambee to experience all that this community has to offer!

Housing

The homes in Riverwest are mainly single family unites or duplexes. Though there are some examples of newer construction, the majority of these homes were built when the area was settled by Polish and German immigrants, between the late 1800s and the 1920s. As a result, there are examples of unique Milwaukee architecture, such as the Polish flat and the Milwaukee Bungalow. Many homes have retained the built-in cabinets and leaded glass features that make these homes distinctive.

In 2016, the listing price range was $46,500 to $234,900, with a median list price of $140,700. The median close price was $155, 500.

Neighborhood Assets

Ken Park, a vast Milwaukee County Park, boasts one of the oldest remaining groves of majestic Sycamore trees, as well as basketball courts, a baseball field, a tennis court and picnic facilities. Just to the east of Kern Park are ribbons of hiking trails along the Milwaukee River. This stretch of the Milwaukee River Bank has been restored to its natural state, providing an escape into nature without sacrificing the convenience of city living.

 

To learn more about the TIN home rehab loan program, the Healthy Neighborhood Initiative or the Beerline Trail Extension, please contact Amy Rohan at 414.906.9650 or amyr@riverworksmke.org

Quick Links

See what Havenwoods has to offer!
The Harambee Great Neighborhood Initiative

Harambee Neighborhood Videos on LISC Milwaukee

Harambee Great Neighborhood Initiative Facebook Page

Upcoming Neighborhood Events

Action Projects

Quick Facts

  • Area: 1.210 square miles
  • Population: 12,481
  • Average household size: 2.9 people
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© 2010 Take Root Milwaukee. Take Root is a service mark of Freddie Mac.

The consumer information on TakeRootMilwaukee.org is used with permission from Freddie Mac. Freddie Mac offers extensive, regularly updated consumer information about buying and owning a home on its website, www.FreddieMac.com, in the “About Homeownership” section. Freddie Mac is not responsible for content errors or omissions on TakeRootMilwaukee.org.

The funding source of this activity is the Milwaukee Homeownership Consortium and Freddie Mac.